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Monday, June 06, 2005

Who we are

Participants in African Americans for Democracy are volunteers from around the country, and even Americans living abroad. We come from different walks of life, but we're all pursuing a common cause of black political empowerment, activism, and impact.

We generally do things locally, in our own communities, and share what we do and coordinate across the miles. Here's news from Akilah, our amazing treasurer:

"Yesterday, I had the pleasure of introducing [Democratic National Committee Chairman] Howard Dean to fellow members of my state legislative district: elected officials, business leaders, and party activists. We had a 1.5 hour general Q&A period with the Chairman regarding what the DNC's strategy is to revitalize the party and take back the Congress! Dean also emphasized that the national pollster of DNC is African-American, in addition to 1/3 of his senior staff: since we're the Democrats' most loyal voting block, it must be reflected in the hiring of staffers and consultants. [note: this is greater representation than the DNC has ever had - Q]

Aside from enjoying the optimism generated by having an opportunity to talk about the issues important in Seattle -- economic development, reducing disproportionality in criminal sentencing, restoring voting rights and reaching out to the post-civil rights generation -- I used the gathering to tell more people about AAFD. Every time I communicate our goal of building the "black donor class", I have received a positive reception. I will be hosting a small group of elected officials & experienced political advisors at my home on June 13, and I'm really excited about the opportunity to build more awareness of what we're capable of doing offline."


A number of people in AAFD are active in their own way. Most of us are obviously interested in politics and its impact on our lives. Many of us are learning how to flex our relationships and abilities from the non-political world in the political realm.

There's lots more going on. I hope you join us.

Emancipated by Quintus Jett @ 10:46 PM

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Quintus, thank you for sharing your experience, and for having the courage to speak up for the Black Community. It seems that standing up for serious issues of great concern, like disproportionality in sentencing and economic development (which should include health care and social security). I am grateful that you are using your voice to share what is on my heart. May God be with you always.

Posted by Anonymous Anonymous @ Tuesday, June 07, 2005 2:18:00 PM #
 

Quintus, thank you for sharing your experience, and for having the courage to speak up for the Black Community. It seems that standing up for serious issues of great concern, like disproportionality in sentencing and economic development (which should include health care and social security), is politically incorrect these days. It seems that many of us are ashamed to say what is right and what is true. I love God, which means I love justice. I am grateful that you are using your voice to share what is on my heart. May God be with you always.

Posted by Anonymous Anonymous @ Tuesday, June 07, 2005 2:20:00 PM #
 

It's nice to know that I'm "amazing" - thanks, Quintus :).

For those of you not in Seattle, what you think I should tell the folks at my house next Monday? I think $20 from 1 million black people can make a big difference in not only keeping folks in office, but also electing the kind of people who will advance policies in the best interest of African-Americans.

What should we doing to build offline awareness? Should we shoot for having a few $150/plate fundraisers with a great keynote speaker in several locations by the end of the year? Dean's presidential campaign had a lot of success with house parties: is that something we should start this summer? What other types of fundraising activities do you think would work?

Posted by Blogger Akilah Stewart @ Tuesday, June 07, 2005 5:33:00 PM #
 

Anoymous:

Thanks for your kind words. I think that one of the things that empowers us and give us resilience, as Black people, is that many of us have a relationship with a power that is greater than ourselves.

I think we all can walk a little taller when we recognize that we're not alone : )

Posted by Blogger Quintus Jett @ Tuesday, June 07, 2005 10:33:00 PM #
 

in Spain we think the same



www.SiouxCafe.tk

Posted by Anonymous Anonymous @ Wednesday, June 08, 2005 10:43:00 PM #
 
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